Treasure Vase

The Treasure Vase

Its symbolic meaning was almost always associated with the ideas of storage and the satisfaction of material desires. In the sagas and fairy-tales of many different cultures, for example, there is the recurring idea of an inexhaustible vessel.

Physically, the ‘vase of inexhaustible treasures‘ is modeled on the traditional Indian clay water pot or kumbha with a flat base, round body, narrow neck and fluted upper rim. However much is removed from it, this vase remains perpetually full.

In relation to Buddhism it specifically means the spiritual abundance of the Buddha, a treasure that did not diminish, however much of it he gave away.

Treasure Vase Qi

Treasure Vase Qi is a set of meditation techniques developed over 2000 years ago to help Buddhist Monks cope with  the long difficult journeys that they made when travelling between monasteries  to receive teachings. This would involve travelling over mountains and across deserts with only a bare minimum of belongings and supplies.
 
 Buddhist Masters understood that when the mind is in complete stillness, the body will not change as the environment changes. So the Treasure vase Qi  was taught to help  the practitioner develop the purity and stillness of being, which brings the body under the complete influence of the mind.
 

These practices use the union of the three mysteries to enable anybody to enter the meditative state within just 15 mins.

Workshop

 Introductory session

Usually the first 40 mins of the workshop, this session introduces  the principles of Mudra, Mantra and Visualisation ( the Three Mysteries)  and  a summarized version of the main meditation is taught which is a very practical meditation in it’s own right.. This can be taken as a stand alone session with no obligation to stay for the rest of the  workshop.
Next Introductory Session

Workshop

The first three meditations of Treasure Vase Qi are taught with background information about how the meditations work.

Outer Qi Generating and Releasing method:
This meditation removes blockages from and strengthens the Wei (Protective) Qi of the body which increase energy and promotes self healing.

Warming and Cooling Methods
Simple yet very effective techniques to keep the body cool in Summer and warm in Winter.

The workshop is lead by Abbot Paul King, who will clearly explain how these practices can be incorporated into everyday life. As Paul States:

“You do not need to be Buddhist to benefit from these practices, just by following simple steps you can make real changes to your life”

Full course notes are provided and an Empowered CD of the practice is available to buy at a discounted rate on the day.

Harvard and the
Himalayan Monks

Professor Herbert Benson and his team of researchers from the Harvard School Of Medicine went to remote monasteries in the Himalayan mountains in the 1980′s to discover, decode, and document the subtle ways through which the monks manipulate their bodies – like raising the temperatures of their fingers and toes by as much as 17 degrees, and lowering their body’s metabolic rate by up to 64%.

The Treasure Vase techniques are similar in effect to those used by these monks.

What is Qi?

“Qi, (also qì or ch’i; gi in Korean, and ki in Japanese) in traditional Chinese culture is an active principle found in any living thing. Qi literally translates as “breath”, “air”, or “gas”, and figuratively as “material energy”, “life force”, or “energy flow”. It is the central underlying principle in traditional Chinese medicine and martial arts. It is comparable to concepts of prana in Hinduism, pneuma in ancient Greece, mana in Hawaiian culture, lüng in Tibetan Buddhism, ruah in Hebrew culture, and vital energy in Western philosophy.”
Wikipedia: Qi

Wei Qi – Protective Qi

Wei Qi is a classification of Qi that is otherwise known as our protective Qi. It is our first line of defense against external factors that cause illness. The stronger and more nourished our protective qi, the healthier and more resistant we are to external pathogens that cause illness.

Treasure Vase Qi

Treasure Vase Qi is a set of meditation techniques developed over 2000 years ago to help Buddhist Monks cope with  the long difficult journeys that they made when travelling between monasteries  to receive teachings. This would involve travelling over mountains and across deserts with only a bare minimum of belongings and supplies.
 
 Buddhist Masters understood that when the mind is in complete stillness, the body will not change as the environment changes. So the Treasure vase Qi  was taught to help  the practitioner develop the purity and stillness of being, which brings the body under the complete influence of the mind.
 

These practices use the union of the three mysteries to enable anybody to enter the meditative state within just 15 mins.

 Workshop

 Introductory session

Usually the first 40 mins of the workshop, this session introduces  the principles of Mudra, Mantra and Visualisation ( the Three Mysteries)  and  a summarized version of the main meditation is taught which is a very practical meditation in it’s own right.. This can be taken as a stand alone session with no obligation to stay for the rest of the  workshop.
Next Introductory Session

Workshop

The first three meditations of Treasure Vase Qi are taught with background information about how the meditations work.

Outer Qi Generating and Releasing method:
This meditation removes blockages from and strengthens the Wei (Protective) Qi of the body which increase energy and promotes self healing.

Warming and Cooling Methods
Simple yet very effective techniques to keep the body cool in Summer and warm in Winter.

The workshop is lead by Abbot Paul King, who will clearly explain how these practices can be incorporated into everyday life. As Paul States:

“You do not need to be Buddhist to benefit from these practices, just by following simple steps you can make real changes to your life”

Full course notes are provided and an Empowered CD of the practice is available to buy at a discounted rate on the day.

Next Workshop

Harvard and the
Himalayan Monks

Professor Herbert Benson and his team of researchers from the Harvard School Of Medicine went to remote monasteries in the Himalayan mountains in the 1980′s to discover, decode, and document the subtle ways through which the monks manipulate their bodies – like raising the temperatures of their fingers and toes by as much as 17 degrees, and lowering their body’s metabolic rate by up to 64%.

The Treasure Vase techniques are similar in effect to those used by these monks.

What is Qi?

“Qi, (also qì or ch’i; gi in Korean, and ki in Japanese) in traditional Chinese culture is an active principle found in any living thing. Qi literally translates as “breath”, “air”, or “gas”, and figuratively as “material energy”, “life force”, or “energy flow”. It is the central underlying principle in traditional Chinese medicine and martial arts. It is comparable to concepts of prana in Hinduism, pneuma in ancient Greece, mana in Hawaiian culture, lüng in Tibetan Buddhism, ruah in Hebrew culture, and vital energy in Western philosophy.”
Wikipedia: Qi

Wei Qi – Protective Qi

Wei Qi is a classification of Qi that is otherwise known as our protective Qi. It is our first line of defense against external factors that cause illness. The stronger and more nourished our protective qi, the healthier and more resistant we are to external pathogens that cause illness.

The Science Behind 
An Ancient Practice.

Something magical happened in England in April 1975. For the first time in scientific history, a lucid dreamer named Alan Worsley, signaled that he was consciously aware in a dream. This magical moment provided the first scientific evidence for lucid dreaming, or the ability to become consciously aware of dreaming, while asleep in the dream state. Moreover, it scientifically validated an important practice in the dream yoga of Buddhism.

Rarely does an ancient spiritual practice make it across the bridge of scientific scrutiny to be welcomed into the land of scientific evidence. Once considered impossible, lucid dreaming was now irrefutably accepted by science.

Lucid Dreaming 

On the surface, lucid dreaming seems deceptively simple – a paradoxical state in which you know you are dreaming while you are dreaming. There you can fly through space, create fire breathing dragons and cast spells like Harry Potter, all in the safety of your subconscious mind.

Uk Worshops – June 2017 – click for more info

Historically though, experienced lucid dreamers have used lucid dreaming as an expressway to greater self-realization, spiritual wisdom and access to creativity’s source. The Indian Buddhist yogi, Naropa, suggested that the main technique of dream yoga, lucid dreaming, provided serious students on of the six pathways to enlightenment.

Scientifically validated for more than thirty years, recent neuroscientists have deemed lucid dreaming a ”hybrid state of consciousness” , since the dreaming brain and portions of the waking/conscious brain show simultaneous activation. In other words, when you lucid dreaming, your conscious mind and your subconscious mind appear joined in a shared creative collaboration or a unique hybrid state of consciousness.

Now lucid dreamers have begun to explore lucid dreaming’s potential to investigate consciousness, the nature of mind and the psyche. Already numerous accounts exist of lucid dreamers using this special state for emotional healing and even physical healing. Moreover, some lucid dreamers feel that they  have encountered another layer of the self and a reservoir of unconscious information; two concepts theorized by Carl Jung.

Uk Workshops June 2017

Lucid Dreaming as a Path to Personal
Growth, Healing & Spiritual Wisdom

Friday 2nd June 7pm -9pm
Ticket £7.50 (early bird ) £9 on door
 In this introductory workshop you will discover how lucid dreamers use this special state to overcome fears, resolve inner blockages, promote physical healing and move towards a fuller life.

 

 

Historically though, experienced lucid dreamers have used lucid dreaming as an expressway to greater self-realization, spiritual wisdom and access to creativity’s source. The Indian Buddhist yogi, Naropa, suggested that the main technique of dream yoga, lucid dreaming, provided serious students on of the six pathways to enlightenment.

Scientifically validated for more than thirty years, recent neuroscientists have deemed lucid dreaming a ”hybrid state of consciousness” , since the dreaming brain and portions of the waking/conscious brain show simultaneous activation. In other words, when you lucid dreaming, your conscious mind and your subconscious mind appear joined in a shared creative collaboration or a unique hybrid state of consciousness.

Now lucid dreamers have begun to explore lucid dreaming’s potential to investigate consciousness, the nature of mind and the psyche. Already numerous accounts exist of lucid dreamers using this special state for emotional healing and even physical healing. Moreover, some lucid dreamers feel that they  have encountered another layer of the self and a reservoir of unconscious information; two concepts theorized by Carl Jung.

 

Harvard and the
Himalayan Monks

Professor Herbert Benson and his team of researchers from the Harvard School Of Medicine went to remote monasteries in the Himalayan mountains in the 1980′s to discover, decode, and document the subtle ways through which the monks manipulate their bodies – like raising the temperatures of their fingers and toes by as much as 17 degrees, and lowering their body’s metabolic rate by up to 64%.

The Treasure Vase techniques are similar in effect to those used by these monks.

What is Qi?

“Qi, (also qì or ch’i; gi in Korean, and ki in Japanese) in traditional Chinese culture is an active principle found in any living thing. Qi literally translates as “breath”, “air”, or “gas”, and figuratively as “material energy”, “life force”, or “energy flow”. It is the central underlying principle in traditional Chinese medicine and martial arts. It is comparable to concepts of prana in Hinduism, pneuma in ancient Greece, mana in Hawaiian culture, lüng in Tibetan Buddhism, ruah in Hebrew culture, and vital energy in Western philosophy.”
Wikipedia: Qi

Wei Qi – Protective Qi

Wei Qi is a classification of Qi that is otherwise known as our protective Qi. It is our first line of defense against external factors that cause illness. The stronger and more nourished our protective qi, the healthier and more resistant we are to external pathogens that cause illness.

 

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